Question…

 

 

I’ve told you about having removed a too-small mantel from a fireplace wall, and how I intend to paint said wall. Maybe I’ve not shared other thoughts, however, like how I do not want to brick the wall (like the other fireplace – in the rumpus room), nor do I want to add a just-right mantel. I’m thinking simpler is better in the living room, and that fireplace doesn’t need any adornment.

 

But! It has occurred to me that a little texture might be nice. Because of all the art in the room (and therefore color), I don’t think painting the wall an accent color (different from the surrounding walls) is in order. No, I’d like the color to be the same as the rest of the room. And because the wall is right up against the fireplace opening – a working fireplace, I might add – I can’t get too crazy, as fire codes simply don’t allow it. Which brings me back to texture. And in particular, texture that can be painted. Something subtle, maybe. Subdued.

 

I know there are tons of products out there, tons of methods. My question is this: Have you used a texture product/application process, and would you recommend it? This will be my first time trying to add texture to a wall, so I’m interested in any advice you can give.

 

I thank you in advance.

Manufactured Cool

 

 

I think I’ve mentioned our recent A/C problems in passing. Here’s the back story… On July 4th our air conditioner decided to quit. And so it did. I immediately got on the horn to the home warranty folks and the ball of repair started rolling. Sort of. The mess of melting wax that was our repair process took a week and a half to reach its destination. Its destination was conditioned air, y’all.

 

So that was a bit of an ugly spell. Mister and I were dealing with going to sleep in 87-degree heat each night, and we are simply not accustomed to that. We had a fan blowing on us, and we slept with wet washcloths on our heads. Don’t knock it! It helped. A lot. We made do.

 

When the A/C was finally repaired, I was incredibly grateful. I don’t need the house to feel like a meat locker or anything, I just need it to be comfortable. For me, that means setting my thermostat at 80 degrees. That’s high for a lot of folks. But it works for me, so there. And it worked great. Right up until it didn’t.

 

Exactly one week after being repaired, the A/C started blowing hot air. Apparently, something was amiss.

 

So as of this writing, I am once again dealing with the bureaucracy of scheduling a repair of the repair. So far, I’m not too keen on the situation. No, I don’t like overwhelming heat. I also don’t care for a business that doesn’t back up its smack. And right now that is exactly how I see the repair guys.

 

It’s supposed to be over 100 degrees today. Pray for me. Actually, pray for the jokers at the repair joint. I may have to have a conniption fit.