Food Flashback

 

 

Yesterday I was all set to blog about a dish I love: Fava Perfetto. Mister’s Mama had asked me about it recently and I assured her that yes, it was on my website and could be easily found on the “Food” page.

 

Only it wasn’t. After speaking with Mister’s Mama a few weeks ago, I woke in the middle of the night thinking, “Wait! Maybe that recipe isn’t listed! Maybe I never blogged it!” I got up and checked the “Food” page myself and nope – no Fava Perfetto recipe was found.

 

So I began looking for fava beans, with the intention of correcting my omission. It’s Spring, so they’re around. But they’re danged expensive, y’all. One store was charging $5 a pound! Yesterday morning I booked it to the farmers’ market and found the little beauties for $2 a pound. I bought them (and the other required ingredients) and headed home, planning to photograph the preparation process.

 

Just before I grabbed the camera, I did a search of my website and whaddaya know? I did indeed post that recipe – last year. My failure, however, was in not adding the recipe or its link to the “Food” page, where it belongs.

 

So here’s the link for that old post. For Mister’s Mama. And for me. And for you, too, by the way. Like I said, it’s Spring. This little recipe is just a darling. Hope you enjoy it as much as I do.

Fish on Friday

 

 

I don’t know how it happened. I’m not Catholic. So how did Mister and I form the habit of eating fish on Friday?

 

I think I’ve blogged about this before, as this isn’t the first time I’ve wondered about our habit. But it doesn’t matter how much I wonder. For the truth is, I love fish on Friday. It’s super-duper yummy and sometimes it’s even healthy. But mostly I’m about the yummy.

 

Not the Catholic part though. I mean, I don’t care if that works for others. It just doesn’t work for me. But I sincerely appreciate the church’s instituting eating fish on Fridays, lo those many years ago. And I appreciate the re-institution of the habit in my home.

 

Woo-hoo! Fishy-fishy-fish-fish!

Tomatomania is Here!

 

 

I’ve written about Tomatomania before, and it’s worth reading if you’re a tomato freak. It’s also worth checking their site, just in case a Tomatomania event is happening in your neck of the world.

 

As for me, I’ll be putting our plants in the ground in a couple of days. Mister and I have been working hard to get the dirt ready. You’d think it would be fine as it is, being dirt and all, but we’ve upped the ante and that soil is now black gold. It’s beautiful!

 

Of course, we’re tired and digging grit from beneath our nails. And I pulled a hammie, but hey – it’s okay. Or at least it will be in a couple of months when those sweet, sweet to-mates come in.

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

 

 

I’ve been on a week-long sabbatical, and today I break the alcohol fast. I picked a great day, don’t you think?

 

I will also be cooking up a storm. I’m mixing it up this year, trying a new soda bread recipe as well as breaking from cooking all my veggies along with the corned beef. It isn’t that the old stand-by recipes have failed, I just want a change. Change is good, you know.

 

And if you’re Mister, right about now you’re thinking, “Change is pizza.”

 

Don’t ask me. I’m not the boss of him.

 

Happy St. Pat’s, y’all.

Smoky Pimiento Cheese Deviled Eggs

 

 

I found this recipe at the MyRecipes.com site and it has changed my life. Now, I love deviled eggs, y’all. Just about all kinds. When I tried this variety the first time, I knew it would become part of my life and that I’d turn to it again and again. I was right. According to the MyRecipes link for the original recipe, it comes from the chef at Atlanta’s “Wisteria Restaurant” – Jason Hill. If you happen to cross paths with Chef Hill, please give him a big hug from me. And thank him for me, too.

 

If you like deviled eggs, I urge you to try this recipe. I’ve made almost no changes at all, so you can trust the original. I swear.

 

Here’s what you’ll need…

 

 

Eggs, Mayonnaise, Smoked Cheddar Cheese, Jarred Roasted Red Bell Pepper, Dijon Mustard, Cayenne, Green Onions and Country Ham (not shown: Salt, Pepper and Butter)

 

First, hard-boil the eggs. I didn’t photograph this step, as it simply didn’t occur to me. But if you don’t know how to boil eggs, just follow the original recipe’s instructions and there you go. And while I’m on the subject of boiled eggs, know this: there is no shame in not knowing how to do it. We all have to learn some time. And learning is sweet, sweet, sweet!

 

 

Once your eggs have been boiled and have cooled, peel the little orbs then slice in half length-wise.

 

 

Place the yolks in a medium bowl. Place the whites on a plate. If you’re like me, use your antique egg plate. That thing rules! By the way, the original recipe says to use only half the yolks. I use them all and it’s super-duper.

 

 

Add the mayo, grated cheese, chopped red bell peppers, dijon mustard and cayenne to the yolks.

 

 

Mash the yolks and mix the whole she-bang together. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

 

 

Spoon the mixture into the reserved egg whites.

 

 

Prepare your topping ingredients. Clean and chop the green onions (white and light green parts only). Onions done!

 

 

Heat a small skillet and add 1/2 t. butter. Once the butter is melted, add the ham and brown it slightly. Remove from heat and cool, just enough to handle.

 

 

Dice the cooked ham. Ham done! (By the way, I have yet to find real country ham here in La-La Land. The search continues…)

 

 

Sprinkle the green onions over the filled eggs, then sprinkle the diced ham over. (If you have vegetarians to serve, just omit the ham. Or sprinkle over half the eggs. Your call.)

 

 

That’s it! Oh my, y’all. These eggs are so good I can hardly stand it. They’re perfect for Easter, or for St. Patrick’s. They go great with beer!

 

Here’s the printable version, y’all…

Smoky Pimiento Cheese Deviled Eggs
Author: 
Recipe type: Appetizer; Breakfast
Prep time: 
Total time: 

Serves: 12
 

I found this recipe at the MyRecipes.com site and it has changed my life. Now, I love deviled eggs, y’all. Just about all kinds. When I tried this variety the first time, I knew it would become part of my life and that I’d turn to it again and again. I was right. According to the MyRecipes link for the original recipe, it comes from the chef at Atlanta’s “Wisteria Restaurant” – Jason Hill. If you happen to cross paths with Chef Hill, please give him a big hug from me. And thank him for me, too. If you like deviled eggs, I urge you to try this recipe. I’ve made almost no changes at all, so you can trust the original. I swear. They’re perfect for Easter, or for St. Patrick’s. They go great with beer!
Ingredients
  • 12 Large Eggs
  • ¼ c. Mayonnaise (+ 1 T. extra – this is my addition)
  • ¾ c. freshly grated Smoked or Sharp Cheddar Cheese (Please try to find Smoked Cheddar. You will not regret it.)
  • ¼ c. finely chopped jarred Roasted Red Bell Pepper
  • 1 T. Dijon Mustard
  • Pinch of ground Red Pepper (Cayenne)
  • Salt to taste
  • Black pepper to taste
  • ½ t. Butter (my addition)
  • Toppings: sliced Green Onions (White and Light Green parts only) and diced Country Ham (The original recipe suggests sliced pickled okra and spiced pecans as well, but I have yet to try those.)

Instructions
  1. First, hard-boil the eggs. Allow to cool. If you don’t know how to boil eggs, just follow the original recipe’s instructions (http://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/smoky-pimiento-cheese-deviled-eggs-50400000119136/) and there you go. And while I’m on the subject of boiled eggs, know this: there is no shame in not knowing how to do it. We all have to learn some time. And learning is sweet, sweet, sweet!
  2. Once your eggs have been boiled and have cooled, peel the little orbs then slice in half length-wise. Place the yolks in a medium bowl. Place the halved whites on a plate. The original recipe says to use only half the yolks. I use them all and it’s super-duper.
  3. Add the mayo, grated cheese, chopped red bell peppers, dijon mustard and cayenne to the yolks. Mash the yolks and mix the whole she-bang together. Season with salt and pepper.
  4. Spoon the mixture into the reserved egg whites.
  5. Prepare your topping ingredients. Chop the green onions (white and light green parts only). Onions done!
  6. Heat a small skillet and add ½ t. butter. Once the butter is melted, add the ham and brown it slightly. Place on a saucer to cool. When cool enough to handle, dice the browned ham. Ham done!
  7. Sprinkle the green onions over the filled eggs, then sprinkle the diced ham over. (If you have vegetarians to serve, just omit the ham. Or sprinkle over half the eggs. Your call.)
  8. That’s it! Serve immediately, or cover and chill until ready to serve.

 

Perfect Sunday Supper – Chicken and Dumplings!

 

 

I first encountered this “Southern Living” recipe in November 2001. (Original recipe link is here.) I followed it to the letter, then decided to tweak it ever so slightly. Over the last 13 years, Mister and I have enjoyed the dish about once a year. And when I say we’ve enjoyed it, I mean we’ve savored the heck out of it, y’all. I made this recipe a few nights ago, even though it ain’t nowhere close to being cold weather here. And you know what? It didn’t matter. It was still delicious, still full of comfort. And it’s a perfect recipe for a Sunday Supper, or any other night when you’ve got some time for the prep work. Here’s what you’ll need…

 

 

Whole Chicken, Garlic Powder, Dried Thyme, Cayenne Pepper, Chicken Broth Paste (or Granules), Self-Rising Flour, Vegetable Shortening, Dried Poultry Seasoning, Milk and (not shown) Salt, Black Pepper and Bacon Drippings

 

 

Place the whole chicken in a large pot and cover with water.

 

 

Bring to a boil, then add salt, black pepper, garlic powder, dried thyme and cayenne. Cover the pot, reduce the heat and simmer 1 hour. At this point,  I let the whole she-bang cool and then place it in the fridge overnight. I do this because it makes it easier to skim the fat and scum from the cooked broth. And really, that extra fat is unnecessary. The scum is just grody, so yeah, I get that out of there, yo.

 

 

What’s left behind is a beautiful broth. Bring it to a simmer, please.

 

 

Now you have a whole, cooked chicken. You’re gonna want to skin and de-bone the bird, removing any excess fat in the process. Tear the chicken into bite-sized pieces.

 

 

Once finished, you’ll have a beautiful bowl of chicken meat!

 

 

You’ll also have an ugly bowl of chicken skin, bones and fat. You’ll want to get rid of this as soon as possible, as it’s unseemly.

 

 

Add the beautiful chicken to the simmering broth, then add the remaining salt, pepper and bouillon paste/granules to the broth. Return to a simmer.

 

 

Now it’s time to make the dumplings, Dumpling! Add your measured self-rising flour to your sifter (or your strainer, if you’re like me).

 

 

Add the poultry seasoning and cayenne pepper to the flour, then sift into a bowl large enough to hold the ingredients.

 

 

Add the shortening and bacon drippings to the sifted flour mixture. Mix with a pastry blender (or two forks) until crumbly. I have never, ever gotten my flour-fat mixture to the point of appearing like “small peas.” It always just looks like flour to me, and it’s always fine. Don’t fret if a recipe describes an appearance you simply don’t achieve. It’s okay. I promise.

 

 

Add milk, and stir until combined. I always have to knead the dough in the bowl at this point. Simply stirring just doesn’t cut it for me. So I knead the dough until it looks like, well, like a ball of dough. On a funny note, I am fully aware of my using skim milk in the dumplings after using bacon fat. Don’t judge, y’all. It’s what I had on hand.

 

 

On a lightly floured surface, turn out the dough. Flour your rolling pin a bit (or your glass or bottle or whatever the heck you use to roll dough), then roll to 1/8-inch thickness.

 

 

By the way, do you know how very thin 1/8-inch is? It’s half of 1/4-inch, for cry-eye. But it works for dumplings, so there you go.

 

 

Cut the rolled dough into 1-inch-square pieces. I use a pizza cutter for this, and it’s grand. You can use a knife, too. Or a spatula, or whatever. But a pizza cutter rolls it just right for me, and it’s easy. By the way, you can also just tear the dumplings (instead of cutting) and go from there. Your call.

 

 

Bring your simmering broth mixture to a boil. Drop your dumpling squares into the boiling broth mixture, a few at a time, and gently stir. Reduce the heat, cover and simmer the mixture for 25 minutes. Stir often, and gently.

 

 

That’s it! Ladle your chicken and dumplings into a bowl and dig in. This is one nice bowl of goodness, y’all. I highly recommend it. Enjoy!

 

Here’s the printable recipe:

 

Southern Living’s Chicken and Dumplings
Author: 
Recipe type: Entree
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 

Serves: 10
 

I first encountered this “Southern Living” recipe in November 2001. (Original recipe can be found here: http://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/chicken-dumplings-10000000258843/) I followed it to the letter, then decided to tweak it ever so slightly. Over the last 13 years, Mister and I have enjoyed the dish about once a year. And when I say we enjoyed it, I mean we savored the heck out of it, y’all. I made this recipe a few nights ago, even though it ain’t nowhere close to being cold weather here. And you know what? It didn’t matter. It was still delicious, still full of comfort. And it’s a perfect recipe for a Sunday Supper, or any other night when you’ve got some time for the prep work.
Ingredients
  • 1 2-1/2 pound Whole Chicken
  • 3½ t. Kosher Salt, divided
  • ¾ t. Black Pepper, divided
  • ½ t. Garlic Powder
  • ½ t. Dried Thyme
  • ½ t. Cayenne Pepper, divided
  • 1 t. Chicken Bouillon paste (or granules)
  • 3 c. Self-Rising Flour
  • ½ t. Dried Poultry Seasoning
  • ⅓ c. Vegetable Shortening
  • 2 t. Rendered Bacon Drippings
  • 1 c. Milk

Instructions
  1. Place the whole chicken in a large pot and cover with water.
  2. Bring to a boil, then add 1½ t. salt, ½ t. black pepper, garlic powder, dried thyme and ¼ t. cayenne pepper. Cover the pot, reduce the heat and simmer 1 hour. At this point, I let the whole she-bang cool and then place it in the fridge overnight. I do this because it makes it easier to skim the fat and scum from the cooked broth. And really, that extra fat is unnecessary. The scum is just grody, so yeah, I get that out of there, yo. What’s left behind is a beautiful broth. Bring it to a simmer, please.
  3. Now you have a whole, cooked chicken. You’re gonna want to skin and de-bone the bird, removing any excess fat in the process. Tear the chicken into bite-sized pieces. Once finished, you’ll have a beautiful bowl of chicken meat!
  4. You’ll also have an ugly bowl of chicken skin, bones and fat. You’ll want to get rid of this as soon as possible, as it’s unseemly.
  5. Add the beautiful chicken to the simmering broth.
  6. Add the remaining salt, pepper and bouillon paste/granules to the broth. Return to a simmer.
  7. Now it’s time to make the dumplings, Dumpling! Add your measured self-rising flour to your sifter (or your strainer, if you’re like me).
  8. Add the poultry seasoning and ¼ t. cayenne pepper to the flour, then sift into a bowl large enough to hold the ingredients.
  9. Add the shortening and bacon drippings to the sifted flour mixture. Mix with a pastry blender (or two forks) until crumbly. I have never, ever gotten my flour-fat mixture to the point of appearing like “small peas.” It always just looks like flour to me, and it’s always fine. Don’t fret if a recipe describes an appearance you simply don’t achieve. It’s okay. I promise.
  10. Add milk, and stir until combined. I always have to knead the dough in the bowl at this point. Simply stirring just doesn’t cut it for me. So I knead the dough until it looks like, well, like a ball of dough.
  11. On a lightly floured surface, turn out the dough. Flour your rolling pin a bit (or your glass or bottle or whatever the heck you use to roll dough), then roll to ⅛-inch thickness. By the way, do you know how very thin ⅛-inch is? It’s half of ¼-inch, for cry-eye. But it works for dumplings, so there you go.
  12. Cut the rolled dough into 1-inch-square pieces. I use a pizza cutter for this, and it’s grand. You can use a knife, too. Or a spatula, or whatever. But a pizza cutter rolls it just right for me, and it’s easy. By the way, you can also just tear the dumplings (instead of cutting) and go from there. Your call.
  13. Bring your simmering broth mixture to a boil. Drop your dumpling squares into the boiling broth mixture, a few at a time, and gently stir. Reduce the heat, cover and simmer the mixture for 25 minutes. Stir often, and gently.
  14. That’s it! Ladle your chicken and dumplings into a bowl and dig in. Enjoy!

 

D-Squared T-Squared – Week 8

 

 

Hole-y Doughnuts, Week 8′s challenge was mighty tasty!

 

The photo above shows an authentic and delicious Cuban Sandwich from Paseo’s in Seattle, WA. One often encounters a line out the door, with folks hankering for this, their most popular sandwich. And the worst part? They do run out! Not only that, but the joint shuts down for a month or so in the winter. (So if you’re planning to visit, call ahead.)

 

As Mister and I don’t live in Seattle, we only get to nosh on this most divine sammie once in a great while. And nosh we do, friends! The sandwich is so flippin’ good, I’ve actually had dreams about it. I kid you not.

 

Anyhoo, I recently came across a recipe for a Paseo-like sandwich on the “Use Real Butter” blog. I asked Mister if he was game to try and create that edible work of art and it was all I could do to hold him back. (It’s that good, y’all.) We worked out some angles and gathered the necessary ingredients and bam! We hit the ground running.

 

Here’s what I can tell you about the “Use Real Butter” recipe: it’s a great starting point. And for some, it may be more than enough. For Mister and me, however, we needed to tweak a few things. Namely, we used 1.5 T. sweet pickle relish (instead of dill); we used Cuban bread from an actual Cuban bakery; we buttered the cut sides of the bread and pan-toasted before schmearing with the mayo mixture, then broiling until bubbly; we reduced the cooking liquid until thick and divine, then drizzled that over the pork itself; we crisped the drizzled pork in a skillet before putting it on the bread. Those were our changes, and we were quite happy with them. Stuffed and happy!

 

Wow! What an awesome creation! We’re so glad to have stumbled upon the “Use Real Butter” recipe, and thrilled to have this in our files. And though it’s a grand facsimile, it isn’t the real thing. You can bet your sweet ass we’ll be hitting Paseo the next time we find ourselves in Seattle. But for now, our version will have to do. Mightily…

 

Food

 

 

I know I haven’t posted about food for – gulp – ages. This is because I’ve not been making the same thing twice for – gulp – ages. And in order to blog about a dish, one has to make it several times in order to get it right. (Well, I say one when really what I mean is me.)

 

I don’t know what’s happened to me. It would seem I’ve gotten the variety bug wedged in my ear and haven’t yet removed it. Mister doesn’t know what’s coming when we sit down to a meal. And when he does like something – enough to want to have it again some time – he has to savor it in that moment because I (in my present mental state) won’t be coming back to it. Maybe ever.

 

I say that maybe ever part because I just don’t know. I’ve never been this way about food before, so I don’t know if it’s permanent or not. I mean, I’ve always been open to trying new dishes, but I’ve also relied on a few favorites to round out the week. That was my routine for years. Years, I say!

 

Maybe this has been some sort of creative burst, expressing itself through food. Maybe not. If I do come back around again on some of the successful dishes, I’ll be sure to share. Promise.

 

In the meantime, here’s to food variety. Nothing boring about that.

My Friend, Trader Joe’s

 

 

I heard about some major news in the Denver, CO area: Trader Joe’s has opened there!

 

For those of you unfamiliar with Trader Joe’s, it’s a grocery store. It isn’t a giant store or anything, in fact it’s on the smallish side. And yet one could (theoretically) shop there exclusively, and not be left wanting for anything. First opened in Pasadena, CA in 1967, the store is now known across America.

 

Anyhoo, when my Colorado love-bugs told me about the Denver stores, they asked what I buy there. I mentioned a few things during that phone call, but have been thinking about it for a while now. So in the interest of helping very specific people in the mid-west, here are a few Trader Joe’s items – in no particular order – I absolutely love…

 

  • Pound Plus 72% Dark Chocolate – I keep this giant bar on hand and use it more than one might think. Because I’m not a fan of milk chocolate, this is my go-to most of the time when chocolate is called for in a recipe. And a single cube makes a perfect dessert for me.
  • Buttermilk – When I need it, this is where I get it.
  • Half and Half – I don’t know why I love TJ’s Half and Half so much, but I do. More than others. It doesn’t have to make sense. It simply is.
  • President’s Select Extra Virgin Olive Oil – This is my workhorse olive oil. Yes, I have others that are used for special needs, but this one is my everyday oil and I go through it faster than I should. I even use it in cakes and brownies. The olive oil flavor is something I happen to like.
  • Tomato-Basil Marinara Sauce – This simple sauce serves as a base most of the time when I need red sauce. I jack it up, down and sideways – and always to lovely results.
  • Dijon Mustard – I’m a mustard junkie, and this dijon is my fave.
  • Unsweetened Soy Milk – Who needs sugar? This soy milk does its job without causing cavities.
  • Unfiltered Apple Cider Vinegar – This is another product I turn to again and again. And like Olive Oil, I go through this faster than you can believe.
  • Balsamic Vinegar (Jug) – This giant jug of Balsamico is more handy in our kitchen than I can say. I often make Balsamic reductions, and this baby is the vinegar for that. Salad dressings, marinades, sauces – you name it. Jug Balsamico rules.
  • Balsamic Vinegar (Small Bottle) – This Balsamico is aged just enough to give it a bit more quality than the jug. I don’t cook this one, as it’s better than that. And while I do own Balsamico that is so precious as to be dispensed from a dropper (I kid you not), this one serves most of my finer Balsamico needs.
  • Olive Oil Spray – This is another of those oil products that I use, regardless of the flavor. It doesn’t add so much olive oil flavor as to impact baked goods, so I use it all the time.
  • Brown Rice (All Varieties) – I don’t know why I love TJ’s Brown Rices so much, but I do. They’re yummy and consistently good.
  • Sourdough English Muffins – I’ve tried other Sourdough English Muffins, and for me there is no contest. These are the best and I love, love, love them.
  • Creamy, Unsalted Almond Butter – Peanut Butter does exist in our house, but it’s rarely used. Almond Butter on the other hand, is consumed regularly. And this one is primo.
  • Cheese – I’m a cheese whore, y’all. And I do occasionally buy cheese from swank sellers. But most of my cheeses are purchased at Trader Joe’s. There’s a good variety and the quality is consistent. Their Parmigiano-Reggiano is top-notch. Their Cave-Aged Gruyere makes me close my eyes in gratitude. When they carry a special item (usually seasonally), I get it while I can.
  • Instant Chai Latte Mix – I don’t drink this too often, but I do love it. The flavors are lovely and it’s sort of like a dessert for me.
  • Pesto Sauce – In season, I make homemade Pesto. But when that’s gone, I turn to TJ’s. Happily.
  • Jalapeno-Stuffed Olives – These bad boys are too yummy. And in a dirty martini, well, let’s just say Mikki is a happy girl.
  • Cornichons – Love these little French pickles. They add so much to a dish, be it Tuna Tartare or homemade Tartar Sauce.
  • Pure Bourbon Vanilla Extract – This quality Vanilla Extract is top-notch. Please don’t use “Imitation” Vanilla Extract. It’s the little things, Kelly.
  • Skinless, Boneless Chicken Breasts – This package contains individually wrapped breasts, so I can pull out one at a time and keep the rest frozen. This chicken is high-quality and convenient.
  • Black Forest Bacon – Well I mean really, it’s bacon. Of course it’s good! But this one is flippin’ awesome. For me, pig-meat equals love.
  • Select Produce – I admit I don’t buy a lot of produce at TJ’s. This is because I’ve not had the greatest luck with some of it. The list of what I do buy includes Persian Cucumbers, Grape Tomatoes, Bagged Avocados, Green Onions, Fresh Herbs, Lettuces, Blueberries (in season), Meyer Lemons, Shallots, Bananas, Gold Potatoes and Basil (when not growing it myself). And these items are trusted.

 

I’m sure I’m forgetting some things, as I am wont to do. But when I tell you Trader Joe’s is a regular stop for me, I am not lying. I’m talking every single week, people. And I’ve not even mentioned the friendly staff, or the terrible parking, or the fab music. I love Trader Joe’s. I hope the folks of Denver will come to love it, too. Across America, there’s a lot of love for this store. And that’s a beautiful thing.

 

Whether or not you know TJ’s, here’s a little video put together by another Trader Joe’s fan. Enjoy.

Liver and Onions

 

 

Hmm. What possessed me? When the tender said his wife loves the liver and onions, why did I allow myself to be swayed?

 

I’ll tell you why. I flippin’ love liver and onions. When I ordered the dish, I had sense memory visions of tender liver and seasoned gravy. I imagined creamy mashed potatoes, buttery and dreamy.

 

What I got was, well, less than I’d imagined. That was to be expected, I suppose. And honestly, it’s on me for ordering liver and onions in an unknown venue. Live and learn.

 

So in a couple of years, when the hankering again takes hold, I hope I’ll be dealing with a known entity. And by that I mean I hope I’ll be at Kate Mantilini. That place has amazing food.